YCteen publishes true stories by teens, giving readers insight into the issues that matter most in young people's lives.
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Write for Youth Communication: Video
Behind the Scenes: Teen writers describe what it's like to work at YCteen.
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Juvenile Justice (16 found)
Note: These stories are from YCteen and its sister publication, Represent, which is written by and for youth in foster care.
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In the wake of the 17-year-old Trayvon Martin's murder, Geraldo Rivera went on TV to say that black and Hispanic youth shouldn't wear hoodies because it makes them look menacing. Olivia is outraged and argues that Geraldo's logic is demeaning and ridiculous. (full text)
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After Trayvon Martin was killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer who says he shot in self-defense, Anthony points out that feeling threatened and actually being in danger are two different things. (full text)
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This imaginative novel about a teen in foster care, pulls you in with its violent, strange, and dramatic plot—and then gets you to think about your own choices. (full text)
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When the writer gets locked up in juvenile detention for three months, she uses everything she learned in therapy to stay out of fights. (full text)
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Najet, who is serving an eight-year prison sentence, describes the mandatory anger management course she has to take while behind bars. (full text)
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Yusef Salaam was convicted and then exonerated in the 1989 rape of a Central Park jogger. Here, he describes the experience. (full text)
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In his book "I Don’t Wish Nobody to Have a Life Like Mine: Tales of Kids in Adult Lockup," David Chura, a former English teacher at the Westchester County jail, shows how the juvenile justice system, instead of rehabilitating traumatized teens, treats them inhumanely. (full text)
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The writer thinks jail is a joke—until he gets sent there. (full text)
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After being arrested for assault, Fred is sent to a residential treatment center, where he eventually learns ways to deal with his anger and his violent past. (full text)
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The author is serving an eight-year sentence in prison and taking college classes while there so she can come out with her bachelor's degree. (full text)
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Diamonique pays tribute to her two lawyers, who checked in with her, fought for her, gave her good advice, and inspired her to stay out of trouble. (full text)
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Najet is serving an eight-year term in prison for attempted murder and several other charges. She describes a day inside, including working at the mosque, studying for college classes, and avoiding other inmates. (full text)
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The author was incarcerated three times, at an after-school outpatient program, at a residential treatment facility, and finally in adult jail on Riker's Island. He explains which punishments inspired him to straighten up. (full text)
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The author's lust for money gets him in trouble, but he learns to redirect that desire into a plan to become an accountant. (full text)
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Valencia was full of anger from her abusive upbringing and got into a lot of trouble. Some staff wrote her off, but a judge gave her a second chance. (full text)
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Christopher begins to forgive his mom, and they start family therapy together. (full text)

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