YCteen publishes true stories by teens, giving readers insight into the issues that matter most in young people's lives.
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Write for Youth Communication: Video
Behind the Scenes: Teen writers describe what it's like to work at YCteen.
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Identity (22 found)
Note: These stories are from YCteen and its sister publication, Represent, which is written by and for youth in foster care.
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Shameera surprises herself when she’s able to remain strong and brave during two natural disasters. Inspired by her courage in handling these situations, she attempts to conquer her biggest fear: public speaking. (full text)
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Shameera is weary of being compared to her accomplished older brother. She strategizes to carve out her own identity. (full text)
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Bernadette was shy and insecure. In an effort to become more outgoing and confident, she joins several youth councils. (full text)
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A girl interviews three boys about pressure to be more "manly," how they handle that pressure, and if there's anything to gender stereotypes. (full text)
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Aissata, an immigrant from Senegal, is stunned by her classmates’ ignorance about Africa. We do wear shoes, she writes, and don't have lions for pets. (full text)
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The author writes about his ongoing exploration of his sexuality and why bisexual is his current placeholder. He says, “concrete and permanent labels don’t describe how we feel during the discovery process.” (full text)
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DeAnna comes out to her mother as bisexual and gets a surprising response. Eventually, she identifies as a "full-time lesbian." (full text)
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In junior high school, Nesshell was ostracized by her peers for "acting white." More recently, she was taunted and called the N-word by white kids in a chat room. Labeled on both sides, she wonders in frustration whether people are capable of seeing her for herself. (full text)
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At a mostly white private school, Sayda finds her identity as a Latina. (full text)
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Although she’s spent years in foster care, the author fears losing her identity if she is adopted. (full text)
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Isma is a religious Muslim who reads the Qur’an and prays daily. She also loves punk rock. (full text)
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When Zaineb arrives in the U.S. from Pakistan, she faces pressure to abandon her cultural beliefs. (full text)
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Dwan is teased by fellow blacks for “acting white” and wonders why people can’t be more open-minded. (full text)
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Tichelle and her fellow high school cheerleaders aren't taken seriously and she thinks it's because they're girls. She feels they should get more respect: not only do they pump up the crowd, but cheerleading demands skill, discipline, and lots of practice. (full text)
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Xavier is prejudiced against homosexuals and therefore terrified when he finds himself attracted to men. (full text)
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Anita is raised to believe that being a “good Indian girl” means having long hair. Then she gets a haircut. (full text)
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Jamal speaks standard English, can’t dance, and prefers baseball to basketball. Does this mean he’s less black than his peers? (full text)
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Omar feels ashamed that the "normal" kids have parents and he's in foster care, so he tries various ways to hide his group home identity. But when his friend Joseph finds out the truth and accepts him, Omar begins to accept himself. (full text)
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The author is forced by her mother and stepfather to be the maid and nanny to her younger half-siblings. In kinship care, she's allowed to be a child again. (full text)
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Jessica introduces the Identity issue by recounting her journey from creating personas like "tomboy" and "pretty girl" to looking inward for the qualities that make her her. (full text)
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Christina feels unconnected to her name. She doesn't know her father, her mother abused her, and her last name can probably be traced back to slavemasters. She tries out some new names. (full text)
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Activities for groups include writing about their names and exploring oppression and prejudice in the story "The Fairest of Them All" and their own lives (full text)

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