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Write for Youth Communication: Video
Behind the Scenes: Teen writers describe what it's like to work at YCteen.
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High School (100 found)
Note: These stories are from YCteen and its sister publication, Represent, which is written by and for youth in foster care.
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The author feels intense pressure, so she begins taking pills that help her study. The drugs change her into someone she doesn't recognize. (full text)
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Daisy compares Obama and Romney's platforms on education. (full text)
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Jamell, who feels alienated in his foster home and at school, finds comfort with a group of friends who like to skip school together. When he realizes he won't be able to graduate on time, he starts changing his ways. (full text)
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Anthony is teased when his classmates catch him reading a book for fun, but he refuses to change his ways. In fact, he argues that his peers should read more, not less. (full text)
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A round table discussion between teens Ebony Coleman, Kelly Colón, Evin Cruz, Brittany Humphrey, Jimmy Lee, Angelica Petela, Irving Torres, and Renea Williams (full text)
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Mohammed describes how Mr. Seltzer's high standards and demanding regimen brought out the best in his students. (full text)
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YCteen interviews new Schools Chancellor Carmen Farina about issues ranging from overcrowded schools to the reinstatement of art and music programs. (full text)
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When the writer runs for class vice president, she learns how to accomplish goals as a group, something she’d never done before. In the process she masters the art of compromise. (full text)
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When David moves from Seoul, Korea to Flower Mound, Texas, he feels like he’s been transported to another planet. He describes his adjustment to America in vivid and humorous detail. (full text)
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Paige is continually bullied by classmates, but teachers and school administrators ignore her complaints. Finally, she switches schools. (full text)
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Teens describe their favorite teachers and what made them particularly effective and memorable. (full text)
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In this issue's advice column, one teen laments about having too much homework and too little time to spend hanging out with his friends. Lucas has some solutions. (full text)
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Studies that show how later school start times help teens have sparked a national debate, as well as a debate inside the YCteen newsroom. (full text)
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Linda thinks it’s unfair to put students in “gender boxes” by forcing them to wear either a drape for girls or a tuxedo for boys. (full text)
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To keep up at her competitive high school, the author starts abusing Adderall. When she realizes she’s addicted, she struggles to find new ways to manage her stress. (full text)
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Margaret’s always done what’s expected of her but lately she’s questioning whether her education is just preparing her for “some normal, average life.” That’s not what she wants. (full text)
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Desmin explains how a tough, crime-ridden high school and chaotic home life put him on the path to dropping out. (full text)
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Cutting school can hurt your family and your future income, and can put you at risk of ending up behind bars. A new report by teens. (full text)
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Peter’s parents brought him to the United States from China so that he could get a better education. But adapting to life in the U.S. hasn't been easy. (full text)
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Jorge is drawn to art and music, but his parents send him to military school in the hope that he’ll become a Marine. Instead, Jorge spends four years plotting his escape. (full text)
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Shameka feels abandoned when her school makes little effort to help her apply to college. She later realizes that it's also up to her to take some initiative. (full text)
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Margaret is flattered to receive a letter from an organization that claims to find scholarships for talented high school students—until she realizes it’s a scam. (full text)
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Tuli explores how tough school discipline policies and lack of educational support can lead to an increased risk of incarceration for kids who are already struggling. (full text)
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Margaret examines the damaging effects of zero tolerance policies on students, and questions whether they actually keep schools safe. (full text)
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Back in Panama, Madeline had a reputation as a troublemaker. But after her family immigrates to New York, she sees an opportunity to reinvent herself. (full text)
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How much do you know about emergency contraception? We have answers to some common questions. (full text)
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The author’s friends convince him to help them cheat, but he eventually realizes that’s not who he wants to be. (full text)
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When school budget cuts threaten the yearbook program, the author rallies to save it and discovers her inner activist in the process. (full text)
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Use these easy-to-follow tips to help students feel confident about preparing for college. Includes a month-by-month calendar students can use during senior year to stay on top of the application process and financial aid. (full text)
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A month-by-month calendar for applying to college. (full text)
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Julieta's passionate Spanish teacher inspires her to learn about Latin America and stand up against injustice.
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New sex ed curriculum includes an interesting (optional) homework assignment: Students are supposed to go to a drugstore to shop for condoms. Julieta does her homework. (full text)
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Playing the piano is an escape from the pressure Linda puts on herself to be a perfect student. When her self-criticism affects her music, she realizes she needs to ease up. (full text)
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In her senior year, Breanna realizes that she needs to get her grades up if she wants to get into college. (full text)
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Emmanuel is intimidated by the competition at his first speech tournament. When he makes the judges laugh, he realizes that acting confident is part of a winning strategy. (full text)
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Breanna's not happy when she's teamed up with Amani, a quiet, poorly-dressed girl, for a class project. But when another student makes fun of Amani, Breanna decides to defend her. (full text)
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When Barry starts school in New York, he is surprised at how easy it seems compared to the strict approach to education in Guinea. He starts to slack off until he realizes that this new approach to education could help make him more independent. (full text)
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When he is 12, the author’s parents move the family from Hong Kong to New York so that he can have a better education and get into a good university. He feels pressured to excel, but a lack of motivation interferes. (full text)
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After immigrating to New York, Shahlo must convince her parents - and herself - that pursuing her dream of higher education will be worth it in the long run. (full text)
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Neha was failing physics until her teacher went the extra mile to make her believe she could succeed. (full text)
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Many New York City high school grads need extra help before they're ready for college classes. This can hurt their chances of ever earning a degree from CUNY or other colleges. (full text)
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The City University of New York offers several programs to help students transition successfully to college. (full text)
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Irving is initially upset when he's placed in special ed, but eventually finds that a great teacher matters more than a label. (full text)
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DeAnna's habit of cutting class finally catches up with her. She decides to transfer to a new school, but first she must prove that she's serious about starting over. (full text)
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High school students discuss how they fell behind, and what they're doing to get back on track. (full text)
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Anthony only has a few weeks to find a new high school, and the choices are overwhelming. He explains how he got through it and what he learned. (full text)
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In a sidebar to his plagiarism quiz, Evin provides tips on how to make sure you're not plagiarizing. (full text)
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In a quiz with examples, Evin shows readers there's more to plagiarism than cutting and pasting. (full text)
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The writer is being abused at home but can't share that secret with anyone. She bonds with a teacher at school, who offers support and love when the writer needs it most. (full text)
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An article in a school paper, meant to be a satire poking fun of people who are intolerant of gays, offends the student body and leads to a debate about freedom of the press. (full text)
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At 14, Oni decides she no longer wants to be isolated from the hearing world and transfers to a public high school. (full text)
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At a mostly white private school, Sayda finds her identity as a Latina. (full text)
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Moving to different foster homes has disrupted the writer's education, but she still manages to graduate. (full text)
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A college visit is a wake-up call for Edgar, who realizes that to succeed he will have to take more responsibility for his education. (full text)
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Shameka feels abandoned when her school makes little effort to help her apply to college. She later realizes that it's also up to her to take some initiative. (full text)
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A learning disability and the difficulties of living in foster care have caused Eric to fall far behind in high school. (full text)
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When Fan Yi enters a prestigious high school, she’s astounded to find widespread cheating. (full text)
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At a high school for immigrants, Sandra feels comfortable enough to master English. (full text)
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Why did the girl with the best reading score in her whole junior high get left back in 9th grade? (full text)
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To fit in, Jesselin does poorly in junior high—until she realizes she’s jeopardizing her chance to go to college. (full text)
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A sense of failure holds Angi back in school, until she breaks the pattern and gets help. (full text)
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Transferring from a large, impersonal high school to a small, supportive one is the key to Troy’s success. (full text)
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As she gets older, Sarah finds ways to deal with her learning disability, but it never entirely goes away. (full text)
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Cristhians got hooked on hooky parties and fell behind in school. Eventually, she dropped out and got a job, only to realize she wanted much more for herself.
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About 40% of New York City teens missed at least a month of school in 2008-2009. Shahlo explores why the absence rate is so high.
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Two experts explain what the GED is, why prepping for it is so important, and how it's different than a high school diploma.
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After Crystal moves from a Catholic grade school to a public junior high, her fear is slowly replaced by affection.
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Marco feels cheated out of a better education. He was less prepared than other students for the specialized high school admissions test because he didn't know about it, and ends up in a mediocre school.
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In her senior year, Catherine gets expelled. She has fun partying and taking ecstasy with her dropout boyfriend—until a scary experience stops her.
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To avoid getting duped when choosing a New York City public school, prospective students should look at a school's attendance, graduation rates, and other key statistics.
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In a roundtable discussion, five writers consider the pros and cons of ambition in its many guises.
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Rumonat is annoyed that her younger brother gets better grades than her. When he starts slipping up, she has to decide whether to help him or to gloat.
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Starting out at a new junior high school, Crystal puts a wall between herself and her classmates. Only Alexei, a lovable misfit, reaches across the wall to befriend her.
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When Irving realizes that his 4th grade teacher has been criticizing and isolating him because he is dark-skinned, he develops a plan to prove that skin color is not an obstacle for learning.
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In 1998, the police department took over school safety in New York City schools from Dept. of Education staff. Some like the idea, but others feel it creates a prison atmosphere that violates student rights. One critic, the NYCLU, is suing the city to change the policy and remove police from the schools.
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Anita hates the rules at her Catholic school, but soon realizes it’s hard to stay on track without them.
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Working with toddlers in a preschool teaches Gamal more about human nature than he could ever learn in books. As he sees it, children are the last people left on earth who do and say what they truly feel. They display the same behavior and emotions of adults, but without disguise.
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After growing up in Pakistan, Kanwal revels in the intellectual creativity and freedom of her American high school.
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Tanisia struggles in elementary school, but through good study habits and determination she becomes an excellent student and makes it to college.
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Fabio has a learning disability that makes it hard for him to understand language and express himself.
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Cassandra’s high school is diverse, but students rarely mix in the cafeteria.
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Janill’s mother is never satisfied with her accomplishments.
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In Haiti, students are deeply respectful toward teachers and are well-behaved at school. The fighting and disrespect in American schools are a shock for Sabrina.
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Diana is a bookworm in the early grades but drops out when she gets to high school.
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When Dean visits a suburban high school he is shocked to discover clean and quiet classrooms, and a lot of learning going on.
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Omar has trouble concentrating because he gets picked on by the other kids.
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Wilber finds acceptance at a high school for gay youth.
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Anna is shocked by how lax her American school is.
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Artiqua faces sexual harrasment at school.
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Esther’s first day in 8th grade is a nervewracking one: she's a newly arrived immigrant, and her classmates seem “weird.”
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Brandy always assumed she'd go to college, but now her plans are to drive cross country after high school. She's not sure what she'll do after that, but she's had enough of school and she doesn't want to settle down.
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Students tell Zeena they want to break down traditional barriers and have closer, one-on-one connections with their teachers, both inside and outside the classroom. They want help as much with personal problems as with academics.
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Slade makes the transition from a school for the blind to a regular public high school.
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At a time when bilingual education is facing mounting attacks, Jia Lu credits it with being crucial in her successful struggle to learn English as a seven-year-old Chinese immigrant.
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Daniel struggles mightily as a new immigrant who does not speak English. But when he realizes that numbers are a universal language and discovers his own resilience, he begins to find a path in America.
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Maurelhena loves running high school track, yet hates feeling like a dumb jock. Her relay team breaks a New York State record, but she fails to score high enough on the SAT for college scholarship eligibility. She later raises her scores and wins a scholarship.
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At first, M. Joe is bummed out about having to visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art on a weekend to write a school report. But with the help of an arts-loving girl he encounters there, he comes to appreciate the Egyptian exhibits and Dali's melting watches.
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SaeRom writes about the stress of academic demands.
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With school work piling up, Tanya, a high school junior, needs a chat with her older sister to calm down and set priorities.
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Carlos identifies the popular group at his new high school and joins it. Problem is, he doesn't really like those kids -- they gossip and spread rumors. So he moves on to friends who share his interests. (full text)

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