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College (92 found)
Note: These stories are from YCteen and its sister publication, Represent, which is written by and for youth in foster care.
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Jalil explores whether taking a MOOC, a massive open online course, might give him an advantage over other college applicants. (full text)
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Vanessa writes about writing, producing, directing and editing her first movie. (full text)
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What you need to know about preparing to apply for college. (full text)
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Margaret’s always done what’s expected of her but lately she’s questioning whether her education is just preparing her for “some normal, average life.” That’s not what she wants. (full text)
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Shameka feels abandoned when her school makes little effort to help her apply to college. She later realizes that it's also up to her to take some initiative. (full text)
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Margaret is flattered to receive a letter from an organization that claims to find scholarships for talented high school students—until she realizes it’s a scam. (full text)
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Melanie freaks out about applying for college. By talking to her friends and mentors, she realizes that it’s OK not to have everything figured out during her senior year. (full text)
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Anne Marie hangs out in a dorm, makes new friends, and attends college classes while on an overnight tour at Wesleyan University. (full text)
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George researches the candidates' positions on college funding. (full text)
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Use these easy-to-follow tips to help students feel confident about preparing for college. Includes a month-by-month calendar students can use during senior year to stay on top of the application process and financial aid. (full text)
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A month-by-month calendar for applying to college. (full text)
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Tuition is getting more expensive, interest rates on student loans are going up, and George's anxiety is escalating, too. He seeks advice on how to face the challenge of college costs. (full text)
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The "Dream Team," a student group at Juana's school, lobbies for New York's DREAM Act, a bill that would help undocumented students get state financial aid for college. (full text)
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In her senior year, Breanna realizes that she needs to get her grades up if she wants to get into college. (full text)
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When he is 12, the author’s parents move the family from Hong Kong to New York so that he can have a better education and get into a good university. He feels pressured to excel, but a lack of motivation interferes. (full text)
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When Jozina gets into a competitive college prep program, she is overwhelmed by the expectations and doubts whether she's truly "college-ready." (full text)
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Many New York City high school grads need extra help before they're ready for college classes. This can hurt their chances of ever earning a degree from CUNY or other colleges. (full text)
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The City University of New York offers several programs to help students transition successfully to college. (full text)
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Marco is suspicious when his English class turns into a sales pitch for DeVry University. Doing research, he finds plenty of reasons to distrust this and other for-profit colleges. (full text)
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Kelly, an only child, is afraid that her departure for college will leave her mother with "empty-nest syndrome." (full text)
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Allison studies hard for the SAT, but blanks out during the exam. In the end, she feels OK about her performance and realizes her anxiety was overblown. (full text)
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Start preparing for college your freshman year of high school, with this cartoon guide to help you along the way.
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Orubba belongs to a family where the women are expected to cook, clean, and raise a family. But she longs to attend college. (full text)
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A college visit is a wake-up call for Edgar, who realizes that to succeed he will have to take more responsibility for his education. (full text)
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A calendar to help high school seniors keep track of the college application process on a month-by-month basis. (full text)
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Shameka feels abandoned when her school makes little effort to help her apply to college. She later realizes that it's also up to her to take some initiative. (full text)
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Ja’Nelle battles her insecurity and achieves her goal of attending college. (full text)
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Matthew became overwhelmed in college and decided to drop out. With a better sense of what it takes to succeed, he’s now back in school. (full text)
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Kizzy is nervous about attending an overwhelmingly white school in Minnesota. But once on campus she makes friends of all races. (full text)
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When Tamecka goes away to college, she begins missing classes and failing exams, and her first inclination is to blame her foster care background. (full text)
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Chantel is grateful to her mother for incrementally increasing her freedom, especially since she recognizes it isn't always easy to let go.
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Samantha, who is black, has a difficult adjustment to the overwhelmingly white University of Michigan.
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Jordan flourishes at a community college, which he once looked down on as only a fall-back option.
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Marci interviews an expert on how to manage college finances, from securing financial aid to the dangers of credit cards.
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Cassandra is shocked by how difficult it is to navigate all the paperwork and red tape in college.
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Five college professors describe what they expect in the classroom and offer tips to students.
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Sayda is inspired by her aunt, an immigrant who earned a college degree through enormous hard work and sacrifice.
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Janill lays out the basics of applying to college.
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Tanisia struggles in elementary school, but through good study habits and determination she becomes an excellent student and makes it to college.
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A month-by-month calendar for applying to college.
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Janill explains how to apply for federal student aid and scholarships.
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Kenneth is feeling anxious because he doesn’t have a clue about how to pick a college, how to apply, and what to do about financial aid.
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The DREAM Act would allow some illegal immigrant youth to attain legal status and be eligible for in-state college tuition.
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Roderick considers joining the military after high school, because college seems financially out of reach.
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Regina, an African-American student, describes why she wants to attend a black university.
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Samantha, who is black, has a difficult adjustment to an overwhelmingly white college.
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Visiting college campuses gives Latonya insights into college life that she could never get by just reading books.
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Latonya lists common questions that prospective college applicants should ask of students, admissions officers, and alumni.
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When Donna is accepted to college she decides to live at home to save money. But when sharing a room with her sister makes it impossible to study, she takes out a loan to live in a dorm.
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Esther explains how to approach one of the most stressful parts of the application: the dreaded personal essay.
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Anita reviews things to think about when selecting a college, including location, size, and cost.
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Ferentz finds that college has given him the chance to reinvent himself.
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Troy enters college with great expectations, but ends up dropping out.
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Wendy admires her sister’s determination to challenge their traditional family and go to college.
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An in-depth look at how to pay for a college education through a combination of tuition waivers, grants, scholarships, and loans.
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Matt feels pressured to get into a good college.
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SaeRom writes about the stress of academic demands.
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With school work piling up, Tanya, a high school junior, needs a chat with her older sister to calm down and set priorities.
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The ups and downs of living away from home.
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Introduction to an issue about money—managing it, paying for college, what jobs pay, and who you can turn to after you age out. (full text)
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Zhanna is fooled by the ease of buying with her new credit card, and goes into debt. She realizes the plastic had given her a false sense of power and she learns how to budget. (full text)
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Maria interviews someone at Options, a nonprofit program that helps New Yorkers with all things college: choosing one, getting in, and especially paying for it. Maria gives an overview of scholarships, grants, and loans. (full text)
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Ricki writes about foster parents who seemed to be in it just for the paycheck. That lack of support pushed her toward financial independence via jobs, internships, and college. (full text)
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Marlo was homeless several times as a child, with his family. When he becomes homeless again at 18, his concentration and his grades slip. Fortunately, he finds a home. (full text)
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Freshman year, Otis doesn't get his books until late in the semester and realizes his study skills are lacking. He flunks out, but vows to return. (full text)
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Marlo's lust for money gets him in trouble, but he learns to redirect that desire into a plan to become an accountant. (full text)
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A criminal history can be an obstacle to getting into college and, in some cases, getting financial aid. However, it shouldn't stop you from applying. (full text)
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Did you know there are different types of high school diplomas? Or that foster kids can get free money for college? Read on to get the details. (full text)
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Jasmine loses her nerve about going to college, partly because of the cost. Shawn reminds her about foster care scholarships and encourages her to believe in herself. (full text)
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Samantha Flowers explains to La'Quesha how she got financial aid from state and federal government, from Americorps, and from the Gates Millenium Scholars program.
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When Teyu starts college, the College Discovery Program (CD) helps ease her transition and become academically and socially comfortable.
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A guide on how to deal with the challenges and stresses presented by the first year of college.
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Xavier describes his long and winding road to a college degree—and how he paid for it.
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Jarel feels better prepared for college after a year in AmeriCorps.
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Financial aid problems and a busy work schedule make Merli wonder if she should drop out.
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Tips for foster youth on how to find programs and people that can help with the college admissions process.
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Te-Li introduces articles on foster youth and college by looking at her own experience in overcoming fears of applying.
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To reach her goal of attending a competitive college, Hattie sets out to learn 250 SAT vocabulary words in 228 days.
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After eight years in care, Joseph goes off to college with $3,000 in his pocket and fear in his heart. Having two mentors from his former group home helps him get through college.
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Debra interviews a college counselor on the basics of applying to college. The counselor also discusses issues of special concern to foster youth, such as whether to go away to college and what the agency will pay for.
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The college application process can be intimidating; Debra offers some advice that can help.
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Lishone is financing her college education by researching little-known scholarships available to foster youth.
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Merli wants to choose the right college—one that's affordable and where she'll fit in.
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Rana interviews former foster youth Chris Bogle on the difficulties of balancing college and work.
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Luis finds the motivation to go back to high school, but worries about his peers.
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The writers interview a graduate student to find out how she gets by on a small budget.
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Felisha examines several myths about college financial aid and gives the facts.
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The writer needs to get her green card so she can receive financial aid.
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After unsuccessfully pounding the pavement for months, Shaniqua decides that a college degree is the only ticket to a decent job.
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The college application process can be intimidating; Debra offers some advice that can help. (full text)
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James wants to go to college but assumes he can’t afford it. Then a new caseworker helps him create a plan.
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As an African-American male who grew up in foster care, Orlando feels a double stigma. But he’s determined to succeed in college. (full text)

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