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Behind the Scenes: Teen writers describe what it's like to work at YCteen.
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Bullying (51 found)
Note: These stories are from YCteen and its sister publication, Represent, which is written by and for youth in foster care.
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Baaria wonders how teens can be expected to respect one another when Romney and Obama constantly insult each other. (full text)
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Otis is bullied in school, then discovers that on the Internet he can be the aggressor. He goes too far and hurts someone he loves. (full text)
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Paige is regularly bullied by classmates, but teachers and school administrators ignore her complaints. Finally, she switches schools. (full text)
Regret  
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After the writer goes along with a friend’s plan to rob a classmate, he gets caught, suffers the consequences, and re-evaluates his criminal behavior. (full text)
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Ask Lucas is our new advice column that answers questions teens have about love, school, family and friends. Lucas and adult experts provide their insight and suggestions. (full text)
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This author writes about why she is able to forgive someone that bullied her most of her life, and to accept her offer of friendship. (full text)
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After Leah is the victim of a childhood bully, she's inspired to take action against cyberbullies by learning to report on Facebook. (full text)
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To avoid the wrath of her school’s bullies, Trisha obsesses about her appearance—until the new girl helps her develop a new confidence in herself. (full text)
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Alice questions why the word “gay” has become a put-down. (full text)
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Linda feels helpless when her classmates regularly make fun of her naturally thin build, calling her "anorexic." She tries her best to ignore all the mean comments, but later regrets not standing up for herself more. (full text)
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New York's anti-bullying law, the Dignity for All Students Act, provides some protection to victims, but it doesn't go far enough. (full text)
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Some teens deal with their insecurities by bullying others, but there are kinder, gentler ways to make ourselves feel more confident. (full text)
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Breanna's not happy when she's teamed up with Amani, a quiet, poorly-dressed girl, for a class project. But when another student makes fun of Amani, Breanna decides to defend her. (full text)
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In junior high school, Nesshell was ostracized by her peers for "acting white." More recently, she was taunted and called the N-word by white kids in a chat room. Labeled on both sides, she wonders in frustration whether people are capable of seeing her for herself. (full text)
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Daichka doesn't fit in with the other kids at school. She dedicates herself to reading books, and gets the support, acceptance, love, and understanding that she doesn't get from people. (full text)
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Catherine learns how quickly things can escalate beyond the virtual world when a confrontation on Facebook leads to real-life violence. (full text)
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When her friend gets bashed on an anonymous Facebook page, Destiny sees the lasting consequences of online harassment and decides it's time to cut back on her social media use. (full text)
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Media have extensively covered stories of youth driven to
desperation and even suicide by online taunts and aggression. Here, YCteen writers discuss their own experiences and views of cyber abuse. (full text)
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An anonymous cyberbully tries to terrorize Kiara and her friends before the school talent show, but they refuse to be intimidated. (full text)
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YCteen writers take a look at ways Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber, President Obama and others are saying "no more" to online harassment and bullying. (full text)
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Christian's been bullied for years. He tries to fit in with a group of alternative kids who have Mohawks and piercings, but they don't treat him any better. Still his new look boosts his confidence. (full text)
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Teasing drives the author away from her family and into a deep depression. She contemplates suicide, but therapy helps her begin to feel better. (full text)
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When students discover he can’t read, Antwaun is teased and called a “crack baby.” (full text)
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Miguel is constantly bullied by the other residents in his group home. He longs for the love and security of a foster home. (full text)
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Miguel interviews a therapist about the causes and effects of bullying. (full text)
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In junior high, Alice joins a clique of girls who make fun of others and eventually reject her. (full text)
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Physically abused by his mother, Miguel takes out his anger on others by being a bully and on himself by attempting suicide. (full text)
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Jeremiyah is harassed for being gay, but finds ways to maintain his self-worth. (full text)
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Nadishia is tormented at school for not wearing the latest styles. (full text)
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Angelica researches the origins of some common ethnic and racial slurs, and notes that it's the intent of the user—rather than anything inherent in the word—that gives a slur its sting.
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The writer finds a way to help her twin sister, who is mentally retarded, feel confident and empowered.
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Yen gets bullied because she’s Chinese.
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Omar has trouble concentrating because he gets picked on by the other kids.
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Wilber finds acceptance at a high school for gay youth.
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Danny feels remorse for the people he used to beat up and ashamed of the way his presence strikes fear in others.
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Jennifer has been teased and insulted about her size for years.
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Eric still struggles to get along with people after being bullied in his youth.
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When Charlene is teased about her hair, she learns ways to cope.
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The author arrives in foster care at age 6, and expresses his hurt by bullying others.
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Allajah feels degraded by the constant sexual harassment she experiences while walking down the street.
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The writer feels powerful and respected when he torments and picks on other kids.
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After Elie fights his tormentors they stop picking on him, but he loses friends because he acts hard with everyone.
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Karate gives Robin a positive way to release and control his anger.
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Shaniqua is teased at school for “acting white” because she gets good grades and has a big vocabulary.
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Xavier won’t give in to the peer pressure at his group home.
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After Leah is the victim of a childhood bully, she's inspired to take action against cyberbullies by learning to report on Facebook. (full text)
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When Erica joins Facebook, she's pulled into pointless fights and wastes lots of time. (full text)
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Otis is teased in school because he has cerebral palsy. He attempts suicide, then uses therapy to find better ways to communicate and express his anger. (full text)
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Anne is ridiculed by her mother and her peers because of her weight. She longs to be comfortable with who she is and the way she looks.
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Lenny has always been teased about having a large head. He decides to turn the tables on his tormentors by dyeing his hair outrageous colors.
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After witnessing the daily harassment of Jasmine, the scapegoat of her residence, Angela vows to stand up for her.

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