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Issue #254 (November/December 2016) issue cover
Are We Equal Yet?

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Imani’s grandmother raised her to “be every inch a lady,” which means having “a dazzling polite smile etched on my face.” But when she discovers basketball, Imani challenges her grandmother’s definition of womanhood. (full text)

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Jovani writes about how his mother, “who wore the pants” in his house, offered a unique perspective; he never thinks of “masculine” things being better than “feminine” things. (full text)

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For as long as she can remember, the writer’s male relatives teased her about being chubby. She writes about internalizing this criticism and how it affects her body image as a teenager. (full text)

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Imani recalls Facebook posts saying that "THOTs" don't have the right to mourn Maya Angelou's death. Imani questions why women are still put down for being sexual. (full text)

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Jeimmy questions the fairness of her school’s dress code after she’s punished for a violation. She notices that the schoolwide policy only seems to apply to girls. (full text)

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Jeimmy sees parallels between the protagonist Hester Prynne’s humiliation in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s classic novel, The Scarlet Letter, and her experience getting gym-shorted for violating the school dress code. (full text)

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Not only does Aniqa believe her school's dress code contributes to female oppression, she also notices that mostly girls get called out. She observes boys who are allowed to wear shirts displaying naked photos of women. (full text)

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The writer shares her story of the family abuse she struggles with and why she felt cutting was the only way to release her frustrations and anger. (full text)

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Farhana finds her South Asian parents more liberal than most, but still thinks they’re overprotective. She talks to them about needing more independence. (full text)

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When Eunisah explores misogyny as part of a journalism assignment, she discovers that the songs she used to "bob my head to and sing along" were rife with lyrics demeaning women. (full text)

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Teen writers voice their opinions about Donald Trump's history of sexual assault on women and that he feels entitled to that behavior because he's a celebrity. (full text)

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Essay contestants write about if they could go back in time, who they would want to meet and why. (full text)

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When Aniqa starts wearing the hijab, her life changes in significant ways. “Having of my body covered helped me appreciate my inner self…I fell in love with my brains, my dreams, my goals,” she writes. (full text)

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Melvin Pichardo profiles Victoria Pannell, a New York City high school teenager, who advocates for survivors of child sex trafficking. (full text)
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